Moseley and Kings Heath councillor hustings – April 2015

Tonight, Kings Health Residents Forum and Moseley Forum organised hustings for the local councillor election which takes place in May.

Tonight’s event, which took place in the hall at Kings Heath Primary School, was well attended, with a surprisingly few empty chairs.  With six of the seven candidates in attendance (no sign of UKIP’s Rashpal Mondair), it was clear that there was an appetite for community involvement and after a brief three minute introduction by each of the candidates, the rest of the time was given over to questions.

Candidates in attendance

  • Mike FRIEL – Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition
  • Luke HOLLAND – Independent (on Twitter as @lukeeholland)
  • Martin MULLANEY – Liberal Democrats (on Twitter as @mullaney3)
  • Elly STANTON – Green Party
  • Martin STRAKER-WELDS – Labour
  • Owen WILLIAMS – Conservative (on Twitter as @vwozone)

Questions ranged from issues with cuts to the Library of Birmingham, problems with traffic on Kings Heath High St, green waste bins and council tax rises – oh and I even got in one about the much promised local train station.

Rather than write up an account of the hustings, I live-tweeted the whole thing instead.  Here’s a link to a Storify, where I’ve pulled together and sorted the tweets to give you a better flavour of the evening: https://storify.com/lauracreaven/moseley-and-kings-heath-hustings-april-2015

National Stationery Week

NSWbloglogo2It’s pretty common knowledge that I’m partial to a bit of stationery, so I’m really excited to be part of National Stationery Week, or #NatStatWeek as it’s known on Twitter.

National Stationery Week runs from 27 April to 3 May 2015 and aims to celebrate the written word – and, of course, all things stationery.  From pens to paper, stamps to rulers, stickers, note-lets, erasers and everything in between.  It’s pretty much my idea of heaven.

Expect lots of stationery related blogposts shortly!

 

http://www.nationalstationeryweek.com/

 

UKYA Extravaganza

What do you get if you put 35 authors in the top floor of a book shop on a Saturday afternoon and a while pile of people who really like books? Chaos.

I went along to the inaugural UKYA Extravaganza at Waterstones Birmingham New St, which was organised by authors Kerry Drewery and Emma Pass. The idea had been to pull together authors and fans and celebrate the genre that was Young Adult. This was purely a labour of love and with £3 a ticket no one was there for the money and the sheer enthusiasm was palpable.

Sure it was chaotic; it was sometimes a choice between quietly chatting with authors at the back of the room and listening to the panels. But ultimately it was a lovely event, full of enthusiasm and good will – and two groaning tables of cake!

As a fan of YA it was lovely tto hear from authors, some of who I knew and have read their books and others who enticed me into buying their novels whilst I was there – I went home with another five books, much to my groaning ‘to read’ pile’s displeasure! The range of authors, and genres, was fantastic and Emma and Kerry have plans to do some more events, so it’s worth keeping an eye on the hashtag #ukyaextravaganza if you want to go along.

So many authors, I couldn’t fit them all into one photo!

Kerslake debate

Last Wednesday I went to the city council chambers for a public hearing on the Kerslake Review, organised by Pauline from News in Brum. The event was organised because of the lack of debate around the report’s release; “We are bringing the city together to debate the topic the council won’t.”

For those asking what is the Kerslake Review; “In July 2014, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, and Sir Albert Bore, Leader of Birmingham City Council commissioned Sir Bob Kerslake to conduct an independent review of corporate governance in Birmingham City Council.” – Taken from gov.uk, where you can find the report in full.

The debate itself was led by a panel. Chaired by Diane Kemp from Birmingham City University, the panel also included: Pauline Geoghegan of News in Brum; Alex Yip Vice-Chair of BCProject, Business Director; Sohail Hussain, a West Midlands Youth Commissioner; Catherine Staite from Institute of Local Government at University of Birmingham; and David Bailey, Professor of Industry  at Aston University . Deliberately not the usual faces but an impressive line up never the less, one panelist admitted to having not read the 68 page report he was asked to give an opinion on, which felt a little disrespectful. However the majority of the three hours, a strict timeline as the room was being paid for privately by News in Brum (helped out with an impromptu donations on the night), was given over to the floor.

Whilst there were a few conspiracy theories and agenda pushing, these were thankfully minimal and the majority of speakers were considered and thoughtful. There was a real feeling of love for the city, mixed with a sadness that things have gotten this bad, but a desire to move forward and improve; “Birmingham used to lead the way, now what are we leading the way in?”  Speakers from the floor also questioned the links between regional/local government and central government, issues around devolved powers, and a feeling that Birmingham was missing out on funding compared to other areas of the country.  It was clear that there were a lot of informed and passionate people in the audience, with a real desire to see things improve.

Ultimately, whilst the opportunity to talk seemed cathartic, I do wonder what good it will have.  A report on governance felt like it was asking the council to get its house in order, and as there’s been no official forum to debate within the council, it seems that ideas on improvement from residents are even less likely to be heard.  A video at the beginning of the debate illustrated that most people didn’t know about the review and with low turn-outs for local elections, it’s hard to really get a grip on whether residents really understand what their role is with engaging local government, and if they feel there is any at all.  Still at least through the evening’s efforts there is some record of the residents of Birmingham speaking up, officially or not.

I left feeling like there were a lot of people wishing the city well, but no clear, agreed idea of how we the residents, the council itself and both groups together move forward.  I wonder; what happens next?

‘Kerslake Debate 2: Child Poverty in Birmingham’ takes place at Parkside Lecture Theatre, Birmingham City University, near Millenium Point on Friday 13th March, 6.30-9pm. To book a space, visit http://newsinbrum.com/

Related articles

My tweets from the evening https://storify.com/lauracreaven/kerslake-debate-my-tweets

Birmingham Post – Birmingham development centres too much on ‘glamour projects’ http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news/regional-affairs/birmingham-development-centres-much-glamour-8701880

Chamberlain Files – Andy Howell slams council’s ‘shocking’ partnership record and ‘disgraceful’ refusal to debate Kerslake Review
http://www.thechamberlainfiles.com/andy-howell-slams-councils-shocking-partnership-record-and-disgraceful-refusal-to-debate-kerslake-review/

 

National Handwriting Day

IMG_1395.JPGEagle-eyed readers will notice this is actually an American day of note, but it seems a shame to miss such an opportunity to talk about the joys of writing – and I can’t find a British one to celebrate!

I’ve always loved to write; from stories as a child to articles for local publications and, of course, blogging.  Being left-handed my handwriting isn’t always as neat as I’d like, and whilst I was one of the first in my class to be chosen to learn to write in pen (a claim to fame I’m very proud of), there have been struggles with smudges, stained hands and the worst – desks designed to discriminate against us!

Nowadays I still do a lot of handwriting, even though I spend the majority of my day in front of a computer.  I’m a big fan of the ‘to do’ list, with triangles for bullet points you can colour in as a completed task, which is unspeakably satisfying.  I also like the satisfaction of seeing a page of handwritten notes; the way the paper crinkles when you’ve used biro on notepaper.

But my favourite handwriting exercise is something which feels like a bit of a dying art: the ‘Thank You’ note.  I think this stems from my pleasure in receiving letters in the post which aren’t just bills or junk mail and the hope others share it.  I try and write a thank you note whenever I get the chance – or sometimes just a note to friends to say hello.  I’m lucky that my friend Anni feels this way too and whilst we still rely on all the modern technology methods of communication, a note from her in the post always makes me smile.  We also handwrite thank you notes at work to the people that speak or host things as part of our course and often get thank yous for our thanking them.   And of course there are people who use letter writing for much more impressive reasons, like Amnesty International and Jodi Ann Bickley of One Million Lovely Letters.

My enduring love of stationery means that I love having an excuse to buy cards, nice pens to write with, and a particular weakness is notebooks.  I’m massively excited that there’s a UK National Stationery Week in April/May and I’m already trying to come up with reasons to indulge!

So, who wants a letter?!

2014 film round up

I never actually intended to set myself any challenges for films in 2014. I certainly thought about it – see all of the films nominated for an Oscar, watch X amount of foreign/indie/British films, finally see the classic film X. But in the end it came down to realising that I’d already proven I could watch over 50 in a year, if I made time to do so, and at times at the expense of other things.  And I didn’t really want to give up another year to excluding things for the sake of a silly challenge that was too similar to one I’d completed.

Screen shot 2015-01-13 at 00.53.28So for 2014 I decided all challenges were off and to watch whatever I wanted whenever I had time (but still keep a list).  A year of going to the cinema whenever something semi-decent and I sort-of had time put me into a routine of thinking about going more.  Which translated into actually going more.  And is probably how I ended up at 45 films in 2014, without even really trying.  Sure there were still cinema days (three films in one day), but because I realised it was the best way I could recapture old days of binge watching films, something I struggle to do at home now because I get easily distracted by twitter/facebook/instragram/blogs/news/cat videos.  If the phrase didn’t make me shudder I’d suggest that it was much more a sense of being ‘in the moment’ of which what I really mean is absorbed in a good story.

Much like 2013, the list for 2014 is an eclectic one.  There’s was a lot less watching films in non-cinemas and one month I didn’t see anything on a big screen.  However there were still films apparently aimed at children where the audience was mainly made up of adults (I’m looking at you The Lego Movie), superheros, love stories, thrillers, romcoms, action movies, chick flicks, foreign films and even one set in Birmingham itself (Arjun & Alison – good work Cineworld for showing it).  Some of 2014’s gems, for me, were the aforementioned Lego Movie, Her, Veronica Mars, Boyhood, Calvary – and the two films that made me cry, Pride and the Fault in Our Stars.

Anyway, should you be interested, here’s the 2014 Film List.

Smiggle opens in The Bullring

When I was about eight years old I collected erasers – or rubbers as we knew them.  I had two favourites; a rectangular purple rubber with gold Cadburys writing on it that rubbed-out well but could still be counted in my extensive collection and three horse rubbers about the size of your little fingernail with red, green and yellow tips that obviously couldn’t be used.  20-ish years on and my love of stationery hasn’t abated: I still have more notepads than I can use; coloured pens, markers and pencils; a collection of greetings cards and notelets for any occasion; and a bag full of stationery related craft stuff.

DSC_0673

And then Smiggle opened in the Bullring last week.

As I stood wide-eyed in the shop, looking at the adorable erasers shaped like macaroons and ice cream cones, pencil cases with clickable compartments, colourful character festooned notepads and a collection of keyrings, I was immediately eight years-old again and in paradise.  Current-me was also pretty star-struck.

DSC_0670An international stationery brand selling bright, colourful and quirky items, Smiggle was born in Melbourne, Australia in 2003 and made its way to the UK this year.    It’s nice to see a sense of inclusion amongst the stationery, which doesn’t just label ‘blue for boys, pink for girls’ but is more varied.  The current theme in stores when the Bullring branch opened was ‘konnichiwa’, with pandas and ninjas amongst the characters, giving an element of education as well as fun characters. 

A member of staff also mentioned that a lot of the items are designed to be tactile, with pencil cases having raised designs to help children learn.

Frankly I’m not the right person to be giving you a grown-up’s view of this place.  I’m a big kid at heart and my inner-child was clearly in awe of Smiggle.  But what I liked about the store was the great sense of fun.  Sure, it’s very bright and colourful and this might not be to everyone’s tastes, but there’s some fun things in there for most people.  Perhaps it’s just my sense of humour, but I loved the large erasers for ‘Big Mistakes’ and have bought a couple for friends’ emergency kits.  That’s one of the good things about Smiggle’ for a shop solely dedicated to stationery they haven’t hiked up the prices and you can get a number of things for your pocket money – ideal at this time of year for stocking fillers.

I’m already planning my next visit and taking my stationery-loving friends along for moral support (for our purses)…

http://www.smiggle.co.uk/

Disclosure: I was invited down to Smiggle as part of a bloggers event and given a goodie bag. I wasn’t required to say anything nice and they definitely weren’t expecting an insight into eight year-old me’s obsessive rubber/eraser collection. I also may have bought another notebook (please don’t tell my mum). All photos are my own, please don’t use them without permission.

Where have I been?

I haven’t been posting on here as often as I’d like, as I’ve been concentrating on my food and drinks blog.

fulltothebrum_wFull to the Brum is a Birmingham-based blog which celebrates the exciting food and drinks scene in the city.  Since I restarted it in June I’ve been focusing much more on the personal experience side of it – restaurant, cafe and bar reviews as well as product reviews, news and info about events and even the occasional recipe.  I wanted to celebrate the great food and drink adventures I found in and around Birmingham.

This means that Ants in Her Pants has taken a bit of a back seat, but I’m hoping to update more often on all the other adventures I’ve been on – and maybe even occasionally mentioning some of the stuff from Full to the Brum too.

http://fulltothebrum.co.uk/

Lush Christmas

Screen shot 2014-11-23 at 12.54.51It seems Christmas is everywhere, but back at the beginning of October I had the pleasure of being invited to Lush in Solihull for a preview of their festive offerings.

This year Lush have gone a sort of Frozen meets Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with some Nordic Pop influences thrown in for good measure.  That’s to say there’s a nice mix of tradition with some more modern influences.  I particularly liked the idea of the 12 Days of Christmas, with a lovely Lush treat to take you through to the epiphany.

But for me Lush is all about bath bombs/bars/melts.  Ordinarily, I’m more of a shower person, but sometimes life calls for a bath and when it does I always think there should be some bubbles.  I was particularly taken with a couple of the non-Christmas range; the sparkling pumpkin bubble bar with all its glitter and a swirling cylinder which let out an array of colours – just like a firework!  But there’s plenty of adorable Christmas bath bombs, bars and melts too; snowmen, penguins, mini-drums and even one present shaped with a little gift inside.  I admitted to not really understanding the bubble bars (I throw a bath bomb in and wait for bubbles) and one of the lovely ladies at Lush Solihull took pity on me and gave me a demo on how they worked – turns out some of the bars can be broken up and used a few times.

Snow fairy, the delicious Christmas-only shower gel is back too, as are some lovely festive soap.  I picked up some of the Yog Nog which had a lovely creamy feel and smell and a delicious rich red soap both of which I’m looking forward to using.

The lovely ladies and gents of Lush Solihull were great hosts; they took us through the range, taking time to explain the products’ inspirations and development.  I even got a free massage and left with a very glittery arm, which was mighty fun on the bus home.

Roll on Christmas!

Disclosure: I was invited down to the bloggers event and given free samples to take home, however I wasn’t required to say anything nice abut the event of products.  I also spend far too much of my own money that evening, because I’m a big fan of the bath bombs.

How a house move taught me the value of consumerism

Still baring the scars from the last house move 12 months ago (and the one before that 4.5 years ago), I’ve moved house again a few months ago.  

My, now-ex, housemate moved in with her boyfriend and I took the decision that it was time to downsize from half a house to renting a room.  After all, I work full time and my curiosity in exploring and learning more means I’m often out a lot, so saving money and having less space to clutter seemed a wise plan.

However this meant the very painful need to get rid of a lot of things I just wouldn’t have space for.  Despite a trunk full of books going to charity last year, another car-boot full went to a local school’s summer fair fundraiser and several others to another school’s library.  Saucepans, cuddly toys, DVDs and a variety of other miscellaneous items to various charity shops.  Most things went to charity, some went to organisations which give you money for your old things, but mainly it was just about ridding myself of stuff I didn’t need.

A fellow Brummie blogger, Travelling Coral, linked to a blogpost about consumption and the Disease of More.  Thankfully I’ve been pretty fortunate enough to work in jobs I’ve (mostly) enjoyed and haven’t felt the need to buy things to distract me from a terrible 9-5.  But the move has made me recognise that I still buy more things that I need – my groaning bookcases as prime example.

The last paragraph in the blogpost, an almost call to action, really resonated with me and made me think:

“If the goal really is to work until you die, then keep earning, keep spending, keep consuming, and ultimately your goal will be reached.  If the goal is to enjoy at least a portion of your life, to spend time with family and friends, to enjoy what little time we have on this earth, then wake up, get conscious, and make a change.  Slow down.  Breathe.  Take a step back and evaluate your consumption, and ask, at what cost? ”

- from the blog With Husband in Tow.

With the house move scars still so fresh and a spate of celebrations upcoming, it made me realise that maybe the answer wasn’t to clutter up my friend’s houses with more junk, but buy something that would mean spending more time together doing something we enjoy; dinners out and concert tickets, primarily.  After all we can consume more, but we can also consume art and knowledge and good food in the company of friends and loved ones.  And what better way to consume than that?